What is stridor breathing in infants?

Stridor is usually the result of a narrowed or partially blocked airway, the passage that connects the mouth to the lungs. The condition is most common in newborns, infants, and toddlers because their airways are narrower—so even a small blockage can interfere with easy breathing.

How do you treat stridor in babies?

How is stridor treated in a child?

  1. Referral to an ear, nose and throat specialist (ENT)
  2. Surgery, if the stridor is severe.
  3. Medicines by mouth or shots to help decrease the swelling in the airways or treat an infection.
  4. Hospital stay and emergency surgery, depending on how severe the stridor is.

How do I know if my baby has stridor?

The main symptom of stridor is the noise that is heard while your child breathes. The sound of stridor depends on where the blockage is in your child’s upper respiratory tract. If your child has stridor that comes back, he or she may have trouble eating and drinking, and poor weight gain.

When should I be concerned about stridor?

Stridor usually indicates an obstruction or narrowing in the upper airway, outside of the chest cavity. “Stridor in infants, particularly without any associated illness, should always be checked out by a physician,” Walsh says. A number of conditions can block or narrow the upper airway and cause stridor.

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What is the most common cause of stridor?

The most common cause of acute stridor in childhood is laryngotracheobronchitis, or viral croup. The condition is caused most commonly by parainfluenza virus, but it can also be caused by influenza virus types A or B, respiratory syncytial virus and rhinoviruses.

Is stridor common in newborns?

Stridor is usually the result of a narrowed or partially blocked airway, the passage that connects the mouth to the lungs. The condition is most common in newborns, infants, and toddlers because their airways are narrower—so even a small blockage can interfere with easy breathing.

Can stridor go away on its own?

In most cases, congenital laryngeal stridor is a harmless condition that goes away on its own. Although not common, some babies develop severe breathing problems which need treatment. Treatment may include medicines, a hospital stay, or surgery. Treatment will depend on your baby’s symptoms, age, and general health.

How long does a stridor last?

It usually isn’t serious and goes away on its own in about 18 months. Your child might need surgery, but that’s rare. Call your doctor right away if your child has these symptoms: Stridor that gets worse the first 4 to 8 months.

When do babies outgrow stridor?

Most children outgrow the noisy breathing (stridor) by 12-18 months of age.

What stridor sounds like?

It is typically low-pitched and most closely sounds like nasal congestion you might experience with a cold, or like the sound made with snoring. Stridor is a higher-pitched noisy that occurs with obstruction in or just below the voice box.

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What happens if stridor goes untreated?

If left untreated, stridor can block the airway, which can be life-threatening or even cause death. Don’t wait to see if symptoms go away without treatment. Call your healthcare provider if you or your child makes a noisy or high-pitched sound while breathing.

What medication is used for stridor?

Treatment of Stridor

Nebulized racemic epinephrine (0.5 to 0.75 mL of 2.25% racemic epinephrine added to 2.5 to 3 mL of normal saline) and dexamethasone (10 mg IV, then 4 mg IV every 6 hours) may be helpful in patients in whom airway edema is the cause.

Is stridor worse at night?

This is called stridor. The noisy breathing and cough are usually worse at night, especially on the second or third night of the illness. Symptoms can also get worse if your child gets upset. In most children, the symptoms improve over 3-4 days then disappear.